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Listen to these podcasts to learn more about the wonders of the lower Ovens floodplain and the groups who are working hard to manage this vital resource in North East Victoria.

The Ovens River is one of Victoria’s most iconic rivers, loved by many for its pristine waters, abundant fishing and quiet camping spots.It’s an iconic heritage river, and one of two significant rivers in the Murray-Darling Basin that remains unregulated.   

 

Part 1: The Lower Ovens Floodplain

The only major floodplain in the southern Basin with a natural flooding and drying regime, the Lower Ovens effectively takes care of itself, contributing clean, filtered water to the Murray River.  It’s extensive network of wetlands offers a safe nursery for a host of native fish and plant life, combined with the extensive River Red Gum forest which provides excellent habitat and food for a variety of reptiles and birdlife.

Part 2: History of the river

As the caretaker of river health in North East Victoria, the North East Catchment Management Authority (CMA) is working with scientists, partner agencies, landholders and volunteers to protect and manage water quality and biodiversity along the Ovens River.     

In March 2019 the North East CMA, Department of Environment Land, Water and Planning and La Trobe University’s Centre for Freshwater Ecosystems jointly hosted an Ovens River Research Symposium in Wangaratta where river experts and locals came together to share information and learn about the special cultural and natural values of this heritage river.   

Over the course of two days, presenters and locals unpacked current research about hydrology, ecology and biodiversity along the Ovens River.   In this two part podcast, we join a bus tour of the Lower Ovens to explore the history of the river and learn about some of the current challenges and opportunities for managing this special river environment.

Part 3: Managing for the future

In this episode we explore current challenges and opportunities for managing this special river environment, including the impact of weeds, feral animals, recreation and connectivity for fish passage and movement. Climate change, predicted increased demands for irrigation water and growing interest in tourism are also part of a complex management mix.

The Ovens River runs from the steep forested mountains of the Victorian Alps, through wide valleys and open plains to join the River Murray near Lake Mulwala.
The Ovens River runs from the steep forested mountains of the Victorian Alps, through wide valleys and open plains to join the River Murray near Lake Mulwala.
The Ovens River runs from the steep forested mountains of the Victorian Alps, through wide valleys and open plains to join the River Murray near Lake Mulwala.